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Exploring the Most Bizarre and Unconventional Roads Worldwide

  • May 16, 2024
  • 5 minutes read
  • 8 Views

This video and its notes explore various “strangest roads” around the world, some of which are well-known and popular while others are more obscure. The NG City pontoon bridge in China is one such road that is used during wartime and civil emergencies and has a ripple effect that can be dangerous. The North-Young Road in Bolivia, also known as the Death Road, is another example, with its narrow width and dangerous turns that often result in rockslides and accidents. The video also highlights more challenging roads, such as the Gullion Tunnel in California, built with only 26 hands and lacking barriers and lamps. Jake’s Ladder, located in Tasmania, is another such road with its steep gradient and tight hairpin turns, and is only accessible to smaller vehicles with an alpine license.

  • 00:00:00 In this section of the video, the narrator explores the strangest roads in the world. Number 15 is the NG City pontoon bridge in China, which uses floating boats to support the continuous deck for travel. This bridge is temporary and used during wartime and civil emergencies, but it brings in about 10,000 visitors a day. The bridge is less than half a mile long and less than 15 feet wide, and it creates an amazing ripple effect. Number 14 is the North-Young Road in Bolivia, also known as the Death Road. This road connects the capital of La Paz with the low-lying region of Yungas in the Amazonian rainforest. The road must traverse the mighty Cordillera Oriental Mountain chain, and it is one of the longest stretches of continuous downhill road in the world. Built in the 1930s by Paraguayan prisoners during the Chaco Wars, the road is only 11 feet wide, and some sections are unpaved and without guard rails. Warm and humid winds from the Amazon hit the Eastern Slope of the Andes, bringing in heavy rains and fog, making the already dangerous road even more treacherous. Numerous mudslides and tumbling rocks occur, and small waterfalls occasionally rain down from the cliffsides. Motorists can come across groups of daredevil cyclists along this road, and internet fame turned it into a destination for extreme sports enthusiasts, especially downhill bikers.
  • 00:05:00 In this section, the video highlights several strange roads around the world that are worth exploring. One such road is the musical highway in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where drivers can experience a unique listening experience as they travel on a stretch of road that plays a song when they go exactly 45 miles per hour. The song, played by rumble strips, is meant to encourage drivers to follow the speed limit and is designed to be heard clearly only when going at the right speed. Another strange road is the Stelvio Pass in Italy, which is known for its 48-hairpin bends and its challenging terrain. Despite being considered dangerous, the pass has been popular with drivers seeking a thrilling road experience. Finally, the video mentions the Wool yang Tunnel in China, which was carved into the side of a mountain and was not an easy or safe way to travel before the construction of a tunnel in 1972.
  • 00:10:00 In this section, the excerpt discusses the Gullion Tunnel in California and the Carding Pass in the Himalayas. The Gullion Tunnel was built with only 26 hands over a period of five years, and it was extremely difficult to dig. The tunnel lacks barriers and lamps, and it has become a tourist attraction. The Carding Pass, located in the Himalayas, is the world’s highest motorable road. Despite its extreme elevation, visitors can access it with their own cars. However, it is important to acclimate to the high altitude by spending a few days at a lower altitude before driving on the road.
  • 00:15:00 In this section of the video, the transporters focus on some of the most desolate and challenging roads in the world, including Alaska Route 11 and the Tiananmen Highway. Alaska Route 11, built in 1974 as a supply route for the trans-Alaska pipeline system, has strict rules for drivers, with big trucks having the right of way and extreme weather posing risks and challenges for travelers. The Tiananmen Highway, built in 1998 and opened in 2006, is an exhilarating driving experience, with steep turns and heavy traffic in both directions.
  • 00:20:00 In this section of the video, the presenter talks about the “Torossian” or “Troll Path” road in Norway. It is considered one of the country’s thirstiest roads with a steep incline of 9 percent and 11 hairpin bends. The road is located on the Steep Mountainside and reaches its highest point at Stegura, an elevation of 2811 feet above sea level. Driving the topotecan can be dangerous, especially in the dark and wet conditions, as it offers narrow lanes, steep inclines, and unpredictable weather. However, the road is also known for its stunning scenery and the numerous highlights along its 31-mile route. The presenter notes that the original pack horse track can still be seen in some parts of the current road. The construction of the trolls Tegan began in 1916 and was completed in 1936 by King Håkon VII.
  • 00:25:00 In this section of the video, the host takes the viewer on a journey to explore one of the world’s most challenging roads: Jacob’s Ladder. Located on Tasmania’s Ben Lomond Mountain, the road has a maximum gradient of 13% and an average gradient of 6.1%, making it one of the most hair-pinned roads in the country. Vehicles must be no larger than a 22-seat bus and bus drivers must have an Alpine license to travel the road. The speed limit is 18 miles per hour, and anything above that is considered unsafe. Due to the tight hairpin turns, drivers must be cautious and pay close attention to the other vehicles on the road. The ascent is only 11 miles long, but the journey requires meticulous driving and patience.
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