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Is it worth having kids?

  • May 16, 2024
  • 3 minutes read
  • 12 Views

The video explores the question of whether it’s worth having kids, discussing topics such as happiness, finances, the “motherhood penalty”, and compatibility with careers. While there are moments of happiness, research shows that there isn’t much difference between the life satisfaction of parents and those without kids in the long term. The costs of having children can also be high, posing challenges for families to balance finances and careers. Countries with longer and better paid parental leave have smaller pay gaps and higher fertility rates, resulting in economic benefits. Despite the challenges, being a parent is often rewarding and brings extreme levels of joy and happiness.

  • (00:00:00) In this section, the video explores whether having children makes people happy. While there are moments of happiness, according to academics, there isn’t much difference between the life satisfaction of parents and people without kids in the long term. Research shows that while about 80% of American parents say parenting is enjoyable, almost 30% also say it is stressful all or most of the time. The costs of raising children can also be high, with fertility treatments, giving birth in a hospital, food, clothes, nappies, toys, and college tuition adding up to hundreds of thousands of dollars. Despite high costs, people are increasingly having fewer children, which can lead to fewer young workers to support the elderly.
  • (00:05:00) In this section, the video discusses the financial implications of having children and how it can impact a family’s budget. The US only offers 12 weeks of unpaid parental leave, posing a challenge for families who can’t afford to lose their salary for that long. Other countries offer much more generous paid parental leave policies, such as Japan with a year of paid leave, Finland with 14 months, and Britain with a year but only six weeks paid. Childcare costs are also a significant factor, with couples spending over 20% of their salaries on childcare in six OECD countries. In the UK, the costs are so high that some months, it’s more than their mortgage. These financial challenges are causing some families to choose to have fewer children than they would like.
  • (00:10:00) In this section, the concept of the “motherhood penalty” is discussed, which is the pay gap between mothers and other types of employees. When women have a baby, they often take long periods of time out of the workforce due to the limitations of the parental leave system, which leads to career sacrifices and lowered income. Countries with longer and better paid paternity leave, such as Denmark and Sweden, have smaller penalties and a more equal share of unpaid labor, resulting in higher fertility rates. Falling birth rates can cause economic disruption, which may require government intervention through investment in public sectors to support families with children, and open immigration policies. However, this is not just an economic issue, but also a cultural and religious one.
  • (00:15:00) In this section, the video discusses the decision to have children and the compatibility of motherhood and careers. While choosing to have children is a big decision that is governed by deep emotions and practicalities, generous parental leave, cheaper child care, and flexibility at work may make the decision easier. Despite the challenges of parenthood, those who do choose to have babies rarely regret it as they experience extreme levels of joy and happiness. Being a mom may come with its own struggles, but it is also the most rewarding thing that one can do.
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